A SHOCKER! – Installment 9 – May 29, 2008

Posted on May 29, 2008. Filed under: Uncategorized |


In 1991, Al Gore wrote his book, Earth in the Balance, in which he cites his mentor and former professor, the late Dr. Roger Revelle, a renowned oceanographer and the first to recognize the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on the earth’s temperature. Gore’s book called for awareness of carbon dioxide emissions into the air and its effects, and drastic changes in society to combat the perceived problem. The book was published in 1992. Gore spoke before Congress and the U.N. expressing his position that the end was only ten years away and measures must be implemented immediately. Gore put his reputation on the line with his global warming alarmist messages.

About the same time that Gore was writing his book, Prof. Revelle was writing a paper for the American Associaton for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on greenhouse warming with co-authors Dr. Chauncy Star and Dr. S. Fred Singer, which was later presented to the Cosmos Club of Washington, D.C. and published in their monthly journal. According to Dr. Singer, the conclusion was a simple message: “The scientific base for greenhouse warming is too uncertain to justify drastic action at this time.” These words were almost identical to those written by Dr. Revelle to members of Congress after their hearing on global warming in 1988, which was instigated and chaired by Senator Al Gore.

It is noted that then Sen. Timothy Wirth (D., CO) ignored Revelle’s scientific opinion and joined with Gore in escalating the alarm over Earth’s warming climate. On a PBS “Frontline” special, “Hot Politics”, he explained Gore’s ploy, with Wirth’s help, to set the stage for the hearing. They called the weather station and asked what the hottest day of the year was. When they were told that historicially it was June the 6th (or the 9th – Wirth didn’t remember), they scheduled the hearing for that day in June, which turned out to be the hottest day on record for Washington, D.C. Wirth tells that the night before the hearing, they went into the chambers and opened all the windows so that the air conditioners wouldn’t work. It was a set up. During the hearing, people were wiping sweat off their brows. Gore, of course, pushed for immediate legislation to restrict activities that produced CO2 and caused a greenhouse effect. http://planetgore.nationalreview.com/post/?q=MDk2YjVlYTYzZjZkNTRhZWU2NGNkNzcw…=

Revelle’s paper in the Cosmos didn’t get much attention right away. It was a year later, when journalist Gregg Easterbrook, contributing editor to Newsweek, referred to it in a piece entitled “Green Cassandras” in the July 6, 1992 issue of the New Republic, and gave it a political slant. He made the allegation that Gore credited Revelle with introducing him to the problem of climate change, but failed to mention that before his death a year earlier, Revelle had published a paper that concluded that “the scientific base for greenhouse warming is too uncertain to justify drastic action at this time. There is little risk in delaying policy responses.”

Other columnists and editors, including George Will, picked up on this and the contradiction got traction. Just as this embarrassment for Gore was breaking out, he was selected by Bill Clinton to be his running mate in the presidential election of 1992. Gore couldn’t afford the negative press and the controversy, which came up in a vice-presidential debate. Sen. Gore deflected it, charging that Dr. Revelle’s views had been “taken completely out of context.”

In July of 1992, Dr. S. Fred Singer received a phone call from Dr. Justin Lancaster at the Environmental Science and Policy Institute, Harvard University, claiming to be a former associate of Dr. Revelle’s. Lancaster demanded that Singer remove Revelle’s name from the article to be reprinted in the Geyer volume. Aghast at the demand, Singer refused, saying that he could not do that without the author’s permission and the author had died. Also that the copyright belonged to Cosmos.

Lancaster then waged a smear and pressure campaign on Singer to the extent that Singer filed a law suit against him and won! Lancaster took opportunites to say that Dr. Revelle had not really co-authored the piece, then Revelle’s mental capacities were failing at the time. There was evidence to disprove all of the smear tactics engaged in by Lancaster, a fact which he admitted in a legal statement after losing the court battle. During the trial, it was revealed that Al Gore had called Lancaster after Easterbrook’s article came out and asked about Revelle’s mental capabilities and views at the time this paper was written. Lancaster had replied in a letter that Revelle was sharp and these were his stated views.

A member of Gore’s staff, Dr. Anthony D. Socci, tried the same tactics, writing to the Geyer publishers requesting that the Cosmos article be dropped. The “request” was denied. Sadly, Gore was not satisfied with the outcome of Lancaster or Socci’s attempt to squash the inconvenient truth.

http://media.hoover.org/documents/0817939326_283.pdf (direct quote with some abbreviations)

On February 24, 1994, Ted Koppel revealed on his Nightline television program that Vice-President Al Gore had called him and suggested that Mr. Koppel investigate the political and economic forces behind the “anti-environmental” movement. In particular, VP Gore had urged Koppel to expose as fact that several U.S. scientists who had voiced skeptical views about greenhouse warming were receiving financial support from the coal industry and/or groups such as the Lyndon Larouche organizations or Reverend Moon’s Unification Church.

Mr. Koppel didn’t do the VP’s bidding and asked rhetorically, “Is this a case of industry supporting scientists who happen to hold sympathetic views, or scientists adapting their views to accommodate industry?” He closed the show by chastising Gore for trying to use the media to discredit skeptical scientists:

“There is some irony in the fact that Vice-President Gore – one of the most scientifica
lly literate men to sit in the White House in this century – {is} resorting to political means to achieve what should ultimately be resolved on a purely scientific basis. The measure of good science is neither the politics of the scientist nor the people with whom the scientist associates. It is the immersion of hypotheses into the acid of truth. That’s the hard way to do it, but it’s the only way that works.” Ted Koppel

There is no more time to do nothing.

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